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Juvenile gingival hyperplasia

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a recently described benign condition that affects the gingiva of children and young adults. Clinically distinctive, LJSGH presents as a localized area of erythema on the attached gingiva, with a subtly papillary surface architecture BACKGROUND: Juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (JSGH) is a distinct clinicopathological entity of the buccal gingiva of young patients which has been related to several factors such as plaque formation, hormonal modifications, and viral infections; however, its true etiopathogenesis remains unsolved Background: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is an uncommon condition presenting as a well-circumscribed, papillary, and exophytic red soft-tissue lesion commonly on the gingival margin and attached gingiva with distinctive histological features. Up to date, the exact etiology is yet to be determined, while a reactive nature of the disease was suggested Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a recently described entity manifesting as non-plaque-induced gingival overgrowth with distinct clinical, microscopic, and immunohistochemical features Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a poorly understood but distinctive inflammatory hyperplasia occurring in children and young adults. Fewer than 100 cases have been reported since its initial description

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia: a

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia Julia Yu Fong Chang, DDS, MS,a Harvey P. Kessler, DDS, MS,b and John M. Wright, DDS, MS,c Dallas, Texas DEPARTMENT OF DIAGNOSTIC SCIENCES, BAYLOR COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY, TEXAS A&M HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER We report 52 cases of a unique and pathologically distinctive form of inflammatory gingival hyperplasia in young patients DOI: 10.4103/jdds.jdds_8_20 Background: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is an uncommon condition presenting as a well-circumscribed, papillary, and exophytic red soft-tissue lesion commonly on the gingival margin and attached gingiva with distinctive histological features. Up to date, the exact etiology is yet to be determined, while a reactive nature of the disease. With hyperplastic feline juvenile gingivitis, intense gingivitis may begin at the time of tooth eruption, progressing to periodontitis without aggressive early treatment. In many cases, the inflammation is limited to the attached gingiva and does not extend into the oral mucosa or bone as it does in feline juvenile periodontitis (Figure 4 Juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (JSGH) is a distinct clinicopathological entity of the buccal gingiva of young patients which has been related to several factors such as plaque formation, hormonal modifications, and viral infections; however, its true etiopathogenesis remains unsolved ocalized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a gingival hyperplasia with unique clinicopathologic presentation1 that was initially described as juvenile spongi-otic gingivitis (JSG) and considered to be the gingival counterpart of acute spongiotic dermatitis.2 The term LJSGH is preferred b

Characterization of juvenile spongiotic gingival

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a unique gingival pathology of recent characterization. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 Darling and colleagues 2 originally reported 24 cases in 2007 under the name juvenile spongiotic gingivitis Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a distinct type of gingival hyperplastic lesion with specific clinicopathologic features. Evaluation of the morphological characteristics of LJSGH indicates the potential role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as an underlying etiopathogenetic mechanism Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a gingival lesion of unknown cause. The purpose of this study is to present a series of LJSGH cases and compare the findings with the literature OBJECTIVE Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a painless gingival swelling that histologically exhibits hyperplasia of the non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, intercellular edema and spongiosis of the spinus layer, and exocytosis of inflammatory cells

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a distinct subtype of inflammatory gingival hyperplasia that shows lack of response to traditional periodontal treatment, and after surgical excision, recurrence rate of 6-16% has been reported Fernandes D T, Wright J M, Lopes S M P, Santos-Silva A R, Vargas P A, Lopes M A. Localized Juvenile Spongiotic Gingival Hyperplasia: A Report of Four Cases and Literature Review. Clin Adv. Localised juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a benign lesion occurring in young patients as gingival erythema and overgrowth, typically localised on gingiva of maxillary incisors. The aim of this work is to report a case of LJSGH where complete spontaneous regression was achieved together with a review of the literature on the. Background: Juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (JSGH) is a benign proliferation of non-keratinised stratified squamous epithelium with evident spongiosis, exocytosis leukocytes and dilated vessels with varying numbers of inflammatory cells. Although uncertain, it has been suggested that the epithelial proliferation is probably related t

Management of localized juvenile spongiotic gingival

Introduction: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a recently described uncommon and distinctive form of inflammatory hyperplasia. Treatment of this condition has varied from surgical excision to no treatment followed by spontaneous remission Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a recently described benign condition that affects the gingiva of children and young adults. Clinically distinctive, LJSGH presents as.. The laesion had returned twice after limited surgical excision. On the basis of a new, extensive excisional biopsy, additional investigation was carried out by the pathologist, which led to a diagnosis of localised (juvenile) spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH). The aetiology of LJSGH is still unclear OBJECTIVES Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a recently described entity with distinct manifestations. Herein we report a comprehensive histopathologic study of 21 lesions and a literature review. Additionally, we propose a new term that we consider more appropriate. STUDY DESIGN LJSGH cases were retrieved and their clinicopathologic characteristics were assessed

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia

  1. Objective: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a painless gingival swelling that histologically exhibits hyperplasia of the non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, intercellular edema and spongiosis of the spinus layer, and exocytosis of inflammatory cells
  2. antly on the anterior maxillary gingiva
  3. Gingiva bequem und günstig online bestellen. Erleben Sie günstige Preise und viele kostenlose Extras wie Proben & Zeitschriften
  4. Aim Localised juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a benign lesion occurring in young patients as gingival erythema and overgrowth, typically localised on gingiva of maxillary incisors. The aim of this work is to report a case of LJSGH where complete spontaneous regression was achieved together with a review o
  5. Background: Juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (JSGH) is a benign proliferation of non-keratinised stratified squamous epithelium with evident spongiosis, exocytosis leukocytes and dilated vessels with varying numbers of inflammatory cells. Although uncertain, it has been suggested that the epithelial proliferation is probably related t
  6. Title: Localised juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia: A case of spontaneous resolution and a literature review Abstract: Aim Localised juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a benign lesion occurring in young patients as gingival erythema and overgrowth, typically localised on gingiva of maxillary incisors. The aim of this work is to report a case of LJSGH where complete.

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia: A

Gingival hyperplasia is a condition of the mouth involving overgrowth of the gingiva (the gum tissue) surrounding the teeth. Once the condition begins, it creates a cycle of difficulty performing good oral hygiene, leading to higher risk (and possibly more severe symptoms) of overgrowth. Sometimes the condition is referred to as gingival. Localized gingival enlargements e321 Introduction Localized gingival enlargements (LGEs) are common in clinical practice (1,2) and are usually of reactive ori-gin (1,2) developing as a response to chronic local irrita - tion or trauma (3). Most published studies focus on reac - tive LGEs (3-6) i.e. fibrous hyperplasia (FH), pyogeni Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis is a genetic condition that can cause profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Signs and symptoms may be present from birth or begin in later childhood to adolescence. The historical figure, Julia Pastrana and her infant son, likely had this syndrome. The underlying cause of gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis is.

(PDF) Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a lesion with unique clinicopathologic features and unclear pathogenesis [] that was initially described as juvenile spongiotic gingivitis [].It is considered as a rare lesion and represented only 0.069% of 31,469 biopsies accessioned in an oral pathology laboratory during a 7-year period [] Mouth: juvenile hyperplastic gingivitis, illustration relating to dogs including description, information, related content and more. PerryR. Felis ISSN 2398-2950. Related terms: . All information is peer reviewed 1. Paediatr Anaesth. 2000;10(6):682-4. Fibreoptic intubation for massive gingival hyperplasia in juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Seefelder C, Ko JH, Padwa BL

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyper-plasia (LJSGH) is a distinct subtype of inflam-matory gingival hyperplasia, commonly observed in children, with female predomi-nance1,2. LJSGH usually shows lack of response to traditional periodontal treatment, and interestingly, after surgical excision, recurrence rate of 6-16% is reported3. Surgi Gingiva: juvenile gingival hyperplasia, illustration relating to dogs including description, information, related content and more. ReiterAM. Felis ISSN 2398-2950. Related terms: . All information is peer reviewed

Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare hereditary disease with an autosomal recessive transmission. JHF is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, osteolytic bone lesions, flexural joint contractures, and gingival hyperplasia and usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by papular and nodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures and bone involvement in variable degrees. It typically becomes apparent at birth or in infancy, causing severe pain with movement and progressive joint contractures.. Profile Definition Gingival hyperplasia is defined as an enlargement of the gingiva that is noninflammatory, produced by factors other than local irritation, and the result of an increased number of cells. Because gingival hyperplasia denotes a specific histologic diagnosis, clinicians must rule out other causes of gingival enlargement with biopsies of affected tissues. A common [

Hyperplastic Feline Juvenile Gingiviti

  1. Juvenile periodontitis appears as significant gingival inflammation, often with gingival enlargement. (Figure 1) This begins soon after eruption of the permanent teeth (9-12 months of where gingival hyperplasia is present, early gingivectomy is recommended to remove psuedopockets, decrease inflammation, and facilitate plaque control (both.
  2. oglycans by fibroblasts
  3. Juvenile Gingival Hyperplasia. Severe gingivitis can progress on to become a condition known as Juvenile Gingival Hyperplasia. Simply these terms refer inflammation and overgrowth of the gums, which occurs around the time of tooth eruption in the kitten. The gums become thickened and actually grow over the teeth
  4. In some situations, however, gingival hyperplasia is drug-induced or can be a manifestation of a genetic disorder. In the latter, it may exist as an isolated abnormality or as part of a syndrome. If orthodontic treatment is needed in patients with gingival hyperplasia, both orthodontic and periodontal aspects need to be considered
  5. Gingival Hyperplasia. Gingivitis. Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions. Professionals also read Stomatitis Overview of Arrhythmias Overview of Cardiomyopathies Test your knowledge. Tongue Discoloration and Other Changes. A 12-year-old girl is brought to the office by her grandmother because she has had pain in her mouth for the past week..
  6. The flap technique for treating gingival enlargement is very similar to the envelope flaps utilized for periodontal flap surgery. 1. Measure the depth of the pocket/over-growth in several areas on each tooth and mark the buccal surface of the gingiva at the base of the pocket (as above). This can be done with a standard periodontal probe and.

Reappraising localized juvenile spongiotic gingival

  1. Gingival hyperplasia is excessive growth or thickening of gum tissue. This condition is more common in Boxers, Great Danes, Collies, Mastiffs, and Retriever breeds but may be seen in any breed. The hyperplasia is the result of inflammation due to bacteria and plaque or can occur secondary to certain medications (eg. Cyclosporine or Amlodipine)
  2. Darling MR, et al: Juvenile spongiotic gingivitis. J Periodontol 78:1235, 2007. Chang JY, et al: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia [n = 52]. Oral Surg 106:411, 2008. [15% related to orthodontic treatment.
  3. Idiopathic gingival hyperplasia has been described in several case reports. The clinical presentation of the gingiva was similar to that of hereditary gingival hyperplasia but did not have a contributory medical or family history [1-3].General histological findings include normal overlying epithelium, rete pegs extending deep into underlying connective tissues with some areas of hyperplasia.
  4. g news that their young kitten is destined for a life of dental issues because the vet has observed some mild inflammation and gingival pocketing in their kitten around 5-8 months of age
  5. Gingival enlargement. K06.1 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2021 edition of ICD-10-CM K06.1 became effective on October 1, 2020. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of K06.1 - other international versions of ICD-10 K06.1 may differ

Mutations in capillary morphogenesis gene-2 result in the allelic disorders juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis. Am J Hum Genet. 2003 Oct;73(4):957-66. Larralde M, Santos-Munoz A, Calb I, Magarinos C. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis Hyalinization of various body tissues like skin, joints, and bones leads to development of skin papules, gingival hyperplasia, osteolytic lesions in bones, and joint contractures. We had a case of a 3 years old female child with Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis who presented with rectal bleeding Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF), also known as idiopathic gingival hyperplasia, is a rare condition of gingival overgrowth. HGF is characterized as a benign, slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of keratinized gingiva.It can cover teeth in various degrees, and can lead to aesthetic disfigurement. Fibrous enlargement is most common in areas of maxillary and mandibular. The gingival index (GI) is a measurement of gingival health. This includes epuli and gingival hyperplasia. Juvenile hyperplastic gingivitis: Juvenile hyperplastic gingivitis occurs after the permanent teeth have erupted when the cat is between 6 to 8 months of age. This condition is common in Persian and Abyssinian cats but it can occur.

Feline Juvenile Onset Periodontitis

[PDF] Localized Juvenile Spongiotic Gingival Hyperplasia

Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disease with less than a hundred cases reported worldwide and is more prevalent in the middle east due to higher rates of interfamilial marriages. Manifestations can be debilitating, and patients typically present with decreased joint mobility, gingival hypertrophy, nodular skin lesions, papulonodular skin lesions and. Fibreoptic intubation for massive gingival hyperplasia in juvenile hyaline fibromatosis Fibreoptic intubation for massive gingival hyperplasia in juvenile hyaline fibromatosis SEEFELDER, C.; KO, J.H.; PADWA, B.L. 2000-11-01 00:00:00 S IR —We would like to report a case of juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) in order to briefly review the features of JHF, to remind of the limitations of the.

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH ) is a distinct subtype of in ammatory hyperplasia that a ects the anterior facial gingiva in an overwhelmingly, but not exclusively, juvenile population. e condition occurs with a 2.3:1 female predominance in patients who are approximately 12 years old, on average. 1 Clinical the. Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a gingival lesion with unique clinicopathologic features that may involve synchronously multiple sites. We present a case with lesions clinically consistent with LJSGH in four jaw 6. Drug-related gingival hyperplasia (drug-related gingival overgrowth) Description: Drug-related gingival hyperplasia is an increase in gingival size or overgrowth of the gingival tissues in response to particular medications or classes of medication. The gingival enlargement begins in the interdental papillae and spreads across tooth surfaces Term for a heterogeneous group of clinical pictures which have in common an idiopathic, diffuse, non-neoplastic, connective tissue proliferation of the gingiva ( gingival hyperplasia) and hard palate.Some of the diseases are exclusively intraoral (see below gingivitis hyperplastica), some cases are combined with malformations of other organ systems (see below fibromatoses) Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (Wright's lesion) (Smaller red inflamed spot on gingiva) Localized Jevenile Spongiotic Gingivitis Idiopathic - isolated patch of junctional or sulcular epithelium Vast majority occur under 20 with median age of 12. Desquamative Gingivitis

Cryotherapy for localized juvenile spongiotic gingival

Gingival hyperplasia is found among people who take Depakote, especially for people who are female, 50-59 old, have been taking the drug for < 1 month. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (childhood epilepsy occurring early in morning affecting 12 to 18 years): 1 person, 4.00% Palatal and Gingival Cysts of the Neonate. Cyst of the Incisive Papilla. Nasolabial Cyst (Naso-Alveolar Cyst) 3. Non-infectious Papillary Lesions. Inflammatory Papillary Hyperplasia of the Palate. Verruciform Xanthoma. Juvenile Localized Spongiotic Gingival Hyperplasia. 4. Bacterial, Viral, Fungal and Other Infectious Conditions. Actinomycosi

Conservative management of juvenile spongiotic gingivitis

  1. Unexpectedly, two months later, a gingival lesion appeared above the right upper central incisor, diagnosed presumptively as a localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) (Figure 8(a)); after discussing with the oral surgeon, it was decided only to observe the lesion, without any kind of treatment
  2. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis that manifests with 1 to 5 cm skin tumors, gingival hyperplasia, osteolytic bone lesions, and joint contractures. The skin tumors are most often located on the head and periarticular extremities. A case of juvenile hyaline fibromatosis with typical skin tumors that on biopsy exhibited basophilic calcospherules is presented
  3. Gingival hyperplasia or gum status can be scored in three or, better, four grades: grade 0 (normal gum); grade 1 or mild GH (slight overgrowth and thickening of marginal gum, covering up to 1/3 of the crown); grade 2 or moderate GH (moderate gum overgrowth covering 1/2 of the crown), which is the most common form; and grade 3 or severe GH.
  4. Study Chapter 4 flashcards from Josiana Goodman's University of Utah class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. Learn faster with spaced repetition

Abstract Background. Juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (JSGH) is a distinct clinicopathological entity of the buccal gingiva of young patients which has been related to several factors such as plaque formation, hormonal modifications, and viral infections; however, its true etiopathogenesis remains unsolved Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia was also ruled out, as the microscopic results did not match the condition's histopathology—epithelial hyperplasia, severe spongiosis and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate in the chorion. The lymphatic origin of the vessels was confirmed by the absence of erythrocytes in their lumen (Fig. 3.

Localised juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia: A case

Abstract: Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia is a relatively new histopathological diagnosis, presenting as a localized erythematous lesion of the anterior attached gingivae. Presenting in a peri-pubertal age, this condition is often misdiagnosed as 'puberty gingivitis'. Here, two cases presenting to the Joint Paediatric-Oral Medicine clinic at the Eastman Dental Hospital. Congenital gingival hyperplasia, also known as congenital macrogingivae or hereditary gingival fibromatosis, is a congenital hypertrophy of Gingiva due to unknown reason. Gingival hyperplasia cell look like the same with normal gingival cell under microscope, no matter in color or appearance, but the gingival hyperplasia Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia (LJSGH) is a gingival lesion with unique clinicopathologic features that may involve synchronously multiple sites. We present a case with lesions clinically consistent with LJSGH in four jaw quad-rants, confirmed by biopsy and review the English literature on multifocal LJSGH cases Gingival hyperplasia may also occur when microorganisms present in bacterial plaque on tooth surfaces invade the gingival sulcus. The affected gingival tissues are edematous, their consistency is soft, and they may bleed upon gentle probing. 2,3. Several systemic conditions may lead to gingival hyperplasia. For example, in patients with acute.

CASE REPORT Juvenile Spongiotic Gingival Hyperplasia

Gingival hyperplasia; Painful joint contractures; Visceral involvement; Diarrhea; Cases described with features of both diseases; Robert V Rouse MD Department of Pathology Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford CA 94305-5342 . Original posting/updates: 1/20/07, 1/29/1 Localised (juvenile) spongiotic hyperplasia of the gingiva is most often seen on the marginal labial gingiva of the maxilla. The laesion can disappear spontaneously, but surgical excision is generally indicated due to the negative cosmetic effect and influence on oral hygiene associated with gingival enlargement, joint contractures and osteolytic defects of the bones are the most common clinical findings (5). It is associated with a 50% positive family his-tory of consanguinity (2,5). Atypical presentations are com-mon (3,5,24). In patients with gingival hyperplasia, th Gingival Fibromatosis with Hypertrichosis is a rare congenital disorder, with no data available on its prevalence. The presentation of gingival symptoms may occur at birth or infancy. The excess growth of hair may be present at birth, or develop later during childhood years or adolescence. Both males and females may be affected

Paediatric Rheumatology/Series Editor: P. Woo. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the commonest chronic arthritis of childhood with a prevalence of 1 in 1000 in the UK [1, 2].The morbidity from JIA is extensive and includes uveitis, joint damage, growth abnormalities, osteoporosis and adverse psychosocial impact of gingival lesions. This review article describes the identification and treatment of gingival lesions.Recently localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia have been identified , which becomes a part of differential diagnosis for reactive lesions in juvenile patients Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a rare, autosomal recessive disease. We report a 4-year-old female born offirst-degree consanguineous marriage, presenting with gingival hyperplasia, nodular swellings involvingthe both pinna and right ankle joint. She had contractures of elbows, knees and shoulder joints, restrictingthe movements of these joints past such as hypertrophic gingivitis or gingival hyperplasia. Gingival enlargement can be caused by a number of various stimuli, and treatment is based on the underlying cause and pathologic changes.[2] Gingival enlargement is usually caused by local conditions such as poor oral hygiene, food impaction, or mouth breathing. Systemi Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a multisystemic disorder characterized by a triad of cephalic fibrous outgrowths, gingival hyperplasia, and flexion contractures. The aim of this study was to find new ultrastructural features that could be useful for differentiating this entity from other types of fibromatosis

Gingival fibromatosis is a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders that develop as slowly progressive, local or diffuse enlargements within marginal and attached gingiva or interdental papilla. In severe cases, the excess tissue may cover the crowns of the teeth, thus causing functional, esthetic, and periodontal problems, such as bone loss and bleeding, due to the presence of pseudopockets. Multifocal epithelial hyperplasia Giant cell fibroma Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia Inflammatory papillary hyperplasia Molluscum contagiosum Molluscum contagiosum Condyloma CondylomaAcuminatum Cause: HPV 6, 11 (90%), 16, 18 and others Occurs in 1% of sexually active individual GGIINNGGIIVVALAL GINGIVAL HYPERPLASIA GINGIVAL HYPERPLASIA HYPERPLASIA (LJSGH)((LLJJSSGGHH))(LJSGH) • Originally described by Darling et al.1in 2007 as juvenile spongiotic gingivitis • 24 cases (mean age 12 years) • Bright red, multifocal, painless lesions of the labial attached gingiva • Duration 1 month to 2 years LOCALIZED JUVENILE. Gingival fibromatosis 1. Pathology and Differential Diagnosis<br />Gingival fibromatosis and drug-induced fibrous hyperplasia are comprised of dense or moderately dense, rather avascular, bland collagenic connective tissue with scattered chronic inflammatory cells, especially beneath the surface epithelium (Figure 4b)

Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome (juvenile hyaline fibromatosis) is a rare, progressive, autosomal recessive disorder whose main hallmark is the deposition of amorphous hyaline material in soft tissues, with an evolutionary course and health impairment. It may present involvement of subcutaneous or periskeletal soft tissue, or may develop as a visceral infiltration entity with poor prognosis JUVENILE HYALINE FIBROMATOSIS Sahibzada Mahmood Noor1, Muhammad Zubair2, Rahim Bangash3, Zubair Khan4 ABSTRACT Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis is a rare, autosomal recessive disease. We report a 4-year-old female born of first-degree consanguineous marriage, presenting with gingival hyperplasia, nodular swellings involvin Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis and infantile systemic hyalinosis are rare conditions of unknown origin characterized by delayed growth, gingival hypertrophy, papular skin lesions, and joint deformity. In this article, we describe the rare case of a patient with upper gingival hyperplasia Naidu A, Lammert K, Iwase R, Spears R, Allon I, Wright J. Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia originates from junctional gingival epithelium. Annual meeting of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. St Augustine, Fl www.aaomp.org 2014; Koutlas I, Lingen M, Binder S, Gopalakrishnan R, Argyris P, Li X, Wright J

Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF, OMIM # 228600) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder [] that was first described by McMurray as Molluscom fibrosum [].Clinically, it is characterized by skin lesions (nodules and/or pearly papules); gingival hyperplasia; joint contracture; abnormal growth of hyalinized fibrous tissues of the head, neck and extremities; and bone lesions [] Reappraising localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia. J Am Dent Assoc 2019; 150:147. Andlin-Sobocki A, Bodin L. Dimensional alterations of the gingiva related to changes of facial/lingual tooth position in permanent anterior teeth of children Localized Juvenile Spongiotic Gingival Hyperplasia aka Spongiotic gingival hyperplasia Initially described in 2007 Idiopathic gingival alteration; externalized junctional or sulcular epithelium Vast majority under age 20 (median 12 yrs

Localized juvenile spongiotic gingival hyperplasia - OralHyperplastic Feline Juvenile GingivitisGingival OvergrowthTypes of periodontal diseaseOral Path/Oral Medicine/Syndromes 1 - StudyBlueUnilateral gingival fibromatosis Yuwanati M, Akinwar A

• If gingival hyperplasia is present, gingivectomy is recom-mended to remove pseudopockets, decrease inflamma-tion, and facilitate plaque control.9 • Extraction of any significantly diseased teeth is warranted.23 Figure 5. Significant hyperplastic gingivitis in a 10-month-old cat. This pet was referred for stomatitis. However, not Overview. Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis is a genetic condition that can cause profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Signs and symptoms may be present from birth or begin in later childhood to adolescence. The historical figure, Julia Pastrana and her infant son, likely had this syndrome.[6013] The underlying cause of gingival fibromatosis with. Gingival hyperplasia is a medical condition by which a cat's gingival tissue becomes inflamed and enlarged. Enlargement is typically caused by dental plaque or other bacterial growth along the gum line. This condition is relatively rare in cats, and in many cases can be prevented with good oral hygiene habits Fibromatosis is clinically characterized by papulo‐nodular skin lesions, gingival hyperplasia, joint contractures, and abnormal growth of hyalinized fibrous tissue with a predilection for the soft tissues of the head and neck, extremities, and bone lesions. The prevalence of JHF is unknown